Saturday, October 18, 2014
Philip Gould was diagnosed with cancer of the oesophagus in 2008, and in the summer of 2011 he was given three months to live. Filmed during the last two weeks of his life, this intimate portrait reveals Gould’s quest to find meaning in what he called ‘the death zone’. When I Die - Aeon Video
Indeed, bereavement and its handmaiden, melancholy, seem to be sharing a moment of late, taking center stage or hovering in the wings of several current museum exhibitions, on television shows and in films, and in fine art and music, lending a whiff of glamour to a topic most people would prefer to ignore. That aura may partly explain why in recent months many Americans have suspended their dread of the D word to indulge a romance with the Reaper. “There is this darker feeling, a pervasive sense of melancholy in culture and fashion,” said Shelby Lee Walsh, the president and head of research at the Trend Hunter website — perhaps an acknowledgment, Ms. Walsh said, “that life isn’t as wonderful as we see it portrayed on our Instagram accounts.” The Subject of Death Plays a Part in Popular Culture - NYTimes.com
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
NEW YORK (The Borowitz Report)—The president of CNN Worldwide, Jeff Zucker, attempted on Wednesday to defuse the brewing controversy over his decision to change the network’s official slogan from “The Most Trusted Name in News” to “Holy Crap, We’re All Gonna Die.” “This exciting new slogan is just one piece of our over-all rebranding strategy,” Zucker said. “Going forward, we want CNN to be synonymous with the threat of imminent death.” CNN Defends New Slogan - The New Yorker
I was neither Living nor dead, and I knew nothing, Looking into the heart of light, the silence. TS Eliot on Twitter: “I was neither Living nor dead, and I knew nothing, Looking into the heart of light, the silence.”
Wednesday, October 8, 2014

coketalk:

The mystery of existence is being lightly sautéed in olive oil.

Pet lovers are often caricatured as being so dedicated to their animals that they’re a bit, well, crazy. While we’ve already seen unusual funeral services for humans — Alabama’s Holy Smoke lets mourners place loved ones into live bullets, for example — Celestis Pets has created another out-there service which enables pet owners to memorialize their deceased dogs and cats by sending their remains on a space flight.
Developed by Celestis, which has already delivered memorial space flights for humans, the initiative aims to let pet owners give their furry friends a truly unique sending off. Customers send around 1g of cremated remains or a lock of the pet’s hair to Celestis Pets, who will seal it in a durable, engraved capsule. (via Service sends dead pets into outer space | Springwise)

Pet lovers are often caricatured as being so dedicated to their animals that they’re a bit, well, crazy. While we’ve already seen unusual funeral services for humans — Alabama’s Holy Smoke lets mourners place loved ones into live bullets, for example — Celestis Pets has created another out-there service which enables pet owners to memorialize their deceased dogs and cats by sending their remains on a space flight.
Developed by Celestis, which has already delivered memorial space flights for humans, the initiative aims to let pet owners give their furry friends a truly unique sending off. Customers send around 1g of cremated remains or a lock of the pet’s hair to Celestis Pets, who will seal it in a durable, engraved capsule. (via Service sends dead pets into outer space | Springwise)

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

"I’m 87 years old…I only eat so I can smoke and stay alive.. The only fear I have is how long consciousness is gonna hang on after my body goes. I just hope there’s nothing. Like there was before I was born. I’m not really into religion, they’re all macrocosms of the ego. When man began to think he was a separate person with a separate soul, it created a violent situation.
The void, the concept of nothingness, is terrifying to most people on the planet. And I get anxiety attacks myself. I know the fear of that void. You have to learn to die before you die. You give up, surrender to the void, to nothingness.”
- HARRY DEAN STANTON

"I’m 87 years old…I only eat so I can smoke and stay alive.. The only fear I have is how long consciousness is gonna hang on after my body goes. I just hope there’s nothing. Like there was before I was born. I’m not really into religion, they’re all macrocosms of the ego. When man began to think he was a separate person with a separate soul, it created a violent situation.

The void, the concept of nothingness, is terrifying to most people on the planet. And I get anxiety attacks myself. I know the fear of that void. You have to learn to die before you die. You give up, surrender to the void, to nothingness.”

- HARRY DEAN STANTON

(Source: ciaobelatarr)

'Let Me Die In My Footsteps' by Bob Dylan

(Source: youtube.com)

Thursday, October 2, 2014
Sorry Dong  Dong

Sorry Dong  Dong

(Source: heroingranola)

Saturday, September 27, 2014
THOUGH YOU MAY NEVER have attended a funeral, two of the world’s humans die every second. Eight in the time it took you to read that sentence. Now we’re at fourteen. If this is too abstract, consider this number: 2.5 million. The 2.5 million people who die in the United States every year. The dead space this process out nicely so that the living hardly even notice they’re undergoing the transformation. We’d probably pay more attention if no one died all year, and then on December 31 the entire population of Chicago suddenly dropped dead. Or Houston. Or Las Vegas and Detroit put together. Instead, unless a celebrity or public figure dies, we tend to overlook the necro demographic as they slip away into history. The Dead Beneath — Biblio — Medium
Friday, September 26, 2014
Civil War death re-enactors.

 (via Portraits Capture Civil War Re-Enactors Feigning Death - Feature Shoot)