Saturday, April 12, 2014
I was trained to use highly sophisticated tools to rescue those even beyond the brink of death. But I was never trained how to unhook these tools. I never learned how to help my patients die. I committed the protocols of lifesaving to memory and get recertified every two years to handle a Code Blue, which alerts us to the need for immediate resuscitation. Yet a Code Blue is rarely successful. Very few patients ever leave the hospital afterward. Those that do rarely wake up again. It has become clear to me in my years on this job that we need a Code Death. A ‘Code Death’ for Dying Patients - NYTimes.com - NYTimes.com
Thursday, April 10, 2014 Sunday, April 6, 2014
It’s not enough that Internet companies have entered every corner of human existence—now, some are starting to cater to non-existence. In recent years, Google and Facebook have created systems to deal with death, such as suspending inactive accounts and allowing people to bequeath their data to a surviving friend or relative. The newest entry in the e-death industry is a small start-up called Eterni.me, which is taking end-of-life services to Asimovian extremes. “We all pass away sooner or later, leaving only a few memories behind for family, friends and humanity—and eventually we are all forgotten,” the Web site reads. “But what if you could be remembered forever?” (via How to Become Virtually Immortal : The New Yorker)

It’s not enough that Internet companies have entered every corner of human existence—now, some are starting to cater to non-existence. In recent years, Google and Facebook have created systems to deal with death, such as suspending inactive accounts and allowing people to bequeath their data to a surviving friend or relative. The newest entry in the e-death industry is a small start-up called Eterni.me, which is taking end-of-life services to Asimovian extremes. “We all pass away sooner or later, leaving only a few memories behind for family, friends and humanity—and eventually we are all forgotten,” the Web site reads. “But what if you could be remembered forever?” (via How to Become Virtually Immortal : The New Yorker)

Kubrick: I suppose it comes down to a rather awesome awareness of mortality. Our ability, unlike the other animals, to conceptualize our own end creates tremendous psychic strains within us; whether we like to admit it or not, in each man’s chest a tiny ferret of fear at this ultimate knowledge gnaws away at his ego and his sense of purpose. We’re fortunate, in a way, that our body, and the fulfillment of its needs and functions, plays such an imperative role in our lives; this physical shell creates a buffer between us and the mind-paralyzing realization that only a few years of existence separate birth from death. If man really sat back and thought about his impending termination, and his terrifying insignificance and aloneness in the cosmos, he would surely go mad, or succumb to a numbing sense of futility…. Stanley Kubrick on Mortality, the Fear of Flying, and the Purpose of Existence: 1968 Playboy Interview | Brain Pickings
Friday, April 4, 2014

videohall:

Husky dog performs her overly dramatic death trick.

Tuesday, April 1, 2014
I have been at your side for a long time.

I have been at your side for a long time.

(Source: high-aliens)

vdjango:

Shamanic funeral ceremony in Azerbaijan

vdjango:

Shamanic funeral ceremony in Azerbaijan

(Source: ten-qri)

‘Of all escape mechanisms, death is the most efficient.’ —H. L. Mencken the new shelton wet/dry
Now it all makes sense.

Now it all makes sense.

(Source: weheartit.com)

Friday, March 28, 2014
An Overdose of Death (1960) #D-370 (by Sanctus Paulus)

An Overdose of Death (1960) #D-370 (by Sanctus Paulus)

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

"Both of my parents died last year but they’re still sitting outside of my childhood home on google maps."

(Source: heyfunniest)

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

What could be more pleasant than talking about people dying

And doctors really trying

On a winter afternoon at the Carlyle Hotel

in our cocoon.

We also will be dying one day soon.

theparisreview:

Listen to Frederick Seidel read his poem “For Holly Andersen.”